Uganda or Rwanda are perfectly combined with countries such as Tanzania, Kenya and Ethiopia.

 

UGANDA

The top choice national park in south western Uganda is Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, home to almost half of the world’s surviving mountain gorillas.

As well as its famous primates, the park contains 120 other species of mammal – more than any of Uganda’s other national parks – though sightings are less common due to the dense forest. If you’re lucky, you may see forest elephants, eleven species of primate (including chimpanzees and L’Hoest’s monkeys), duikers, bushbucks, African golden cats and the rare giant forest hog, as well as a myriad bird and insect species. For birdwatchers, it’s one of the most exciting destinations ever, with over 350 species found here, including those endemic to the Albertine Rift and several endangered species, such as the African green broadbill.

Venture further in Uganda and visit its largest national park, Murchison Falls, where the Victoria Nile crashes over the rock and descends towards Lake Albert. Here, you can expect to see elephants, Rothschild giraffes, lions, Ugandan kobs (antelopes), waterbucks, buffaloes, hippos and crocodiles plus about 460 bird species.

Most passport holders visiting Uganda require visas, including citizens of the US, Canada, EU, Australia and New Zealand, and the process for obtaining them was moved online in 2016 – visas.immigration.go.ug.

Uganda is one of the countries covered by the East Africa Tourist (EAT) visa, and for those also visiting Kenya and Rwanda on the same trip it is a cheaper alternative.


RWANDA

The survival of mountain gorillas is one of Africa’s greatest conservation success stories, and tourism has played its role in this. Gorilla trekking safaris in Rwanda are our most popular request for this African destination. Although the gorilla permits are expensive (up to $1,500 per person for a one hour visit – 2017), they are aimed at strengthening conservation efforts and supporting local community development; this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to look into the thoughtful, intelligent eyes of a large silverback gorilla is a magical encounter that transcends cost and many other wildlife experiences.

The Virunga Mountains that straddle the borders of Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo, are home to around 480 mountain gorillas, more than half of the world’s entire population (the rest live in Bwindi Impenetrable Forest in Uganda). So in Rwanda, you’d visit the gorillas in  Volcanoes National Park, part of the Virungas, where twelve gorilla groups are now habituated for safaris. This is where Dian Fossey first brought the world’s attention to the plight of these majestic primates in the late 1960s, when only around 250 survived.

Gorilla trekking safaris can be done throughout the year, the most popular times being during the drier months, between December and February, and from about June to mid-September. Hiking can be more demanding in the rainy season from April – May and in November, but at an altitude of 2,000m and more, it can rain at any time of the year. Securing permits for gorilla treks over these periods can be difficult, so plan well ahead.

Many visitors come on holiday to Rwanda to see its famous mountain gorillas, sometimes as an add-on to a safari in Kenya or Tanzania, but you can explore further… ask us for details.

Many travellers also have the Havrix vaccine to guard against infection by hepatitis A and a yellow fever certificate is usually required for entry into Rwanda. Malaria is widespread throughout lowland Rwanda, so malaria precautions are generally essential. 

UK and US travellers need to purchase a visa for Rwanda, which can be obtained on arrival.

Marcel Proust

“The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.”
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“The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.”

Richard Ferris Burton, Explorer 1821 – 1890

“The gladdest moment in human life is the departure upon a distant journey into unknown lands.'
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“The gladdest moment in human life is the departure upon a distant journey into unknown lands.'

Gustave Flaubert

“Travel makes one modest. You see what a tiny place you occupy in the world.”
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“Travel makes one modest. You see what a tiny place you occupy in the world.”

Mark Twain

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbour. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”
2018-06-25T16:29:07+00:00
“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbour. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

Karen Blixen, Out of Africa

“You know you are truly alive when you’re living among lions.”
2018-06-25T16:28:31+00:00
“You know you are truly alive when you’re living among lions.”

Charles Kingsley (Writer 1819 – 1875)

“We act as though comfort and luxury were the chief requirements of life, when all that we need to make us really happy is something to be enthusiastic about.”
2018-06-25T16:24:08+00:00
“We act as though comfort and luxury were the chief requirements of life, when all that we need to make us really happy is something to be enthusiastic about.”

Anita Desai

“Wherever you go becomes a part of you somehow.”
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“Wherever you go becomes a part of you somehow.”

Anon

“Travel not to find yourself, but to remember who you've been all along.”
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“Travel not to find yourself, but to remember who you've been all along.”

Bill Bryson

“To my mind, the greatest reward and luxury of travel is to be able to experience everyday things as if for the first time, to be in a position in which almost nothing is so familiar it is taken for granted.”
2018-06-25T16:29:37+00:00
“To my mind, the greatest reward and luxury of travel is to be able to experience everyday things as if for the first time, to be in a position in which almost nothing is so familiar it is taken for granted.”

Sylvia Dolson, Joy of Bears

“If you reconnect with nature and the wilderness you will not only find the meaning of life, but you will experience what it means to be truly alive.”
2018-06-25T16:22:53+00:00
“If you reconnect with nature and the wilderness you will not only find the meaning of life, but you will experience what it means to be truly alive.”

John Muir

“In every walk with nature, one receives far more than he seeks.”
2018-06-13T17:56:23+00:00
“In every walk with nature, one receives far more than he seeks.”

Karen Blixen

“There is something about safari life that makes you forget all your sorrows and makes you feel as if you had drunk half a bottle of champagne bubbling over with heartfelt gratitude for being alive.”
2018-06-25T16:24:43+00:00
“There is something about safari life that makes you forget all your sorrows and makes you feel as if you had drunk half a bottle of champagne bubbling over with heartfelt gratitude for being alive.”

Bartle Bull, Safari. A Chronicle of Adventure

“Even today, to visit Africa is a feast for the senses. The bush literally brings one’s faculties to life, as you learn to see better, to smell for the first time, to be silent and to listen.”
2018-06-13T17:55:34+00:00
“Even today, to visit Africa is a feast for the senses. The bush literally brings one’s faculties to life, as you learn to see better, to smell for the first time, to be silent and to listen.”

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

“I think you travel to search and you come back home to find yourself there.”
2018-06-25T16:27:58+00:00
“I think you travel to search and you come back home to find yourself there.”
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